Contributors

Noah Comet is Assistant Professor of English at the United States Naval Academy. Read his response to Keats’s 9 October 1816 letter to Charles Cowden Clarke.

 

Hannah Dow is a PhD student at the University of Southern Mississippi’s Center for Writers, where she is an Associate Editor for Mississippi Review. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Ninth Letter, The Journal, and Crab Orchard Review, among others. Read her poem in response to Keats’s 31 October 1816 letter to Charles Cowden Clarke.

 

Allison Dushane is Assistant Professor of English at Angelo State University, where she teaches and researches eighteenth and nineteenth century literature, romanticism, aesthetic theory, environmental writing, and science studies. She is currently in the process of co-editing an annotated scholarly edition of Erasmus Darwin’s The Botanic Garden and finishing a book manuscript titled The Romantic Event: Matter, Agency, and Aesthetic Form. Read her response to Keats’s 17/18 April 1817 letter to J. H. Reynolds.

 

Aaron Howard makes art, music & words in brooklyn amongst his cats, plants & aquaria. Learn more about his work at oilcanpress.com. And read his (or rather, Amerigo Mackeral’s) response to Keats’s 12 or 13 April 1817 letter to John Taylor and James Augustus Hessey.

 

Greg Kucich is Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Keats, Shelley and Romantic Spenserianism, co-editor (with Jeffrey Cox) of two volumes of the Pickering and Chatto Selected Writings of Leigh Hunt, and co-editor (with Keith Hanley) of a collection of articles, Nineteenth-Century Worlds: Global Formations Past and Present. Read his response to Keats’s 9 October 1816 letter to Charles Cowden Clarke.

 

Richard Marggraf Turley is Professor of English Literature at Aberystwyth University, where he is also Professor of Engagement with the Public Imagination. He has written several books on John Keats and the Romantic poets, including Keats’s Boyish Imagination (2004), and Bright Stars: John Keats, Barry Cornwall, and Romantic Literary Culture (2009). He is also author of a historical crime novel set in 1810, The Cunning House (2015). He blogs at richardmarggrafturley.com. Follow him on Twitter @RMarggrafTurley. Read his response to Keats’s 15 April 1817 letter to George and Tom Keats.

 

Anne McCarthy is Assistant Professor of English at Pennsylvania State University. Read her response to Keats’s epistle to George Felton Mathew.

 

Joyelle McSweeney is Professor of English and Director of the Creative Writing Program at the University of Notre Dame. Read her poem in response to the Keats brothers’ 13 June 1816 note to Richard Abbey.

 

Ian Newman is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. Read his response to Keats’s epistle to George Felton Mathew.

 

Jayme Peacock is a PhD candidate at The Pennsylvania State University. Her dissertation focuses on early modern conceptions of immortality and representations of the posthumous body. Her interests also extend to early modern authorship, poetics, and constructions of gender and sexuality. While Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton are her primary authors of interest, John Keats is one of two poets who initially drew her to graduate studies and later helped guide her to her dissertation topic of immortality, that “still unravished bride of quietness.” She maintains more than a passing affection for the poetics of Keats with its early modern undercurrents. Read her response to Keats’s epistle to Charles Cowden Clarke.

 

Victoria Rego is from Charleston, South Carolina. She is an undergraduate student studying English and Creative Writing at the College of Charleston, where she also works as a writing lab consultant and has completed grant funded research on the intersection of Victorian Literature and Popular Tourism. Her short fiction has been featured in Bully  from KY Story, with more of her fiction forthcoming. Read her response to Keats’s 17/18 April letter to J. H. Reynolds.

 

Brian Rejack is Assistant Professor of English at Illinois State University, where he also serves as Interim Director of Undergraduate Studies. Read his response to Keats’s epistle to George Felton Mathew.

 

Jacob Risinger is Assistant Professor of English at The Ohio State University, where he writes and teaches about the literature of the long Romantic period in a transatlantic context. His current book project, Confirmed Tranquility: The Stoic Impulse in Transatlantic Romanticism, examines the ways in which Stoicism became a subject of poetic reflection, ethical inquiry, and political debate in the Romantic period. His essays have appeared or are forthcoming in ELH, SEL: Studies in English Literature, European Romantic Review, Romanticism, and The Oxford Handbook of William Wordsworth. Read his response to Keats’s 17 March 1817 letter to J. H. Reynolds.

 

Matthew Sangster is a Lecturer in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Material Culture at the University of Glasgow.  He works on authorship, archives, libraries, genre and institutions.  His current digital project is Romantic London. Read his response to Keats’s 1 November 1816 letter to Joseph Severn.

 

Kate Singer is Associate Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College. Read her response to Keats’s epistle to George Felton Mathew.

 

Austin Smith is Lecturer in the Department of English at Standford University. His poems and stories have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Poetry Magazine, Yale Review, Sewanee Review, Narrative, VQR, and ZYZZYVA, amongst others. His first collection of poems, Almanac, was chosen by Paul Muldoon for the Princeton Series of Contemporary Poets. Read his response to Keats’s 21 Nov 1816 letter to Haydon.

 

Emily Stanback is Assistant Professor of English and the University of Southern Mississippi. Read her response to Keats’s epistle to George Felton Mathew.

 

John Strachan is Professor of English, Vice-Provost for Research and Development, and Dean of the Graduate College at Bath Spa University. He has written extensively in the field of romanticism, including Advertising and Satirical Culture in the Romantic Period (Cambridge, 2007) and many other essays and chapters. His book of poetry, Waterloo: The Field of Blood, came out in 2015, in time for the battle’s bicentenary. Read his poetic response to Keats’s 10 May 1817 letter to Leigh Hunt.

 

Michael Theune is Professor of English at Illinois Wesleyan University. Read his response to Keats’s epistle to George Keats, and his response to Keats’s 10/11 May 1817 letter to Haydon.

 

Rosie Whitcombe is a PhD student at Birmingham City University. Her research focuses primarily on the letters of John Keats, examining how Romantic period correspondence relates to the process of life and death, and in turn how Keats uses these themes to articulate his identity as letter writer. Her dissertation will provide a new historical and critical account of letter writing with a particular focus on self-fashioning, theories of the epistolary and the text as artefact. Read her response to Keats’s 17/18 April 1817 letter to J. H. Reynolds and to Keats’s 14 September 1817 letter to Jane and Mariane Reynolds.

Tristram Wolff is Visiting Assistant Professor  of English and Comparative Literature at Northwestern University. He teaches and researches in the fields of British and Comparative Romanticisms, critical theory and theories of language, and the environmental humanities. His dissertation, Romantic Etymology and Language Ecology, was a co-winner of the 2015 ACLA Charles Bernheimer Award for best dissertation in the field of comparative literature, and is the basis for his current book project of the same name. Reading texts across a long trans-Atlantic Romanticism, the book argues that when figures such as Herder, Blake, Wordsworth, and Thoreau turned their attention to “natural” temporal processes hidden by linguistic forms, they produced an alternative etymological poetics, one that replaced theories of a primitive linguistic origin with visions both ordinary and revolutionary of language’s constantly changing shape. Read his response to Keats’s 9 March 1817 letter to J. H. Reynolds.

 

Susan Wolfson is Professor of English at Princeton University. She has published extensively on Romanticism and on Keats in books such as The Questioning Presence: Wordsworth, Keats, and the Interrogative Mode in Romantic Poetry; The Cambridge Companion to John Keats; Borderlines: The Shifting of Gender in British Romanticism; Romantic Interactions: Social Being and the Turns of Literary Action; and, most recently, Reading John Keats. She has also edited several scholarly editions and anthologies, including John Keats, A Longman Cultural Edition. Read her response to Keats’s 20 Nov 1816 letter to Haydon.

 

Christine Woody is Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania. She works on nineteenth-century periodicals, print culture, and authorship. Her article on the trope of the “Cockney author” is forthcoming in the Keats-Shelley Journal (Fall 2017). Read her response to Keats’s 25 Mar 1817 letter to Charles Cowden Clarke.